A whiff of History-M.G Road

M.G.Road is one of the busiest roads in the city of Bengaluru and is one of the most happening places too. Shopping malls, pubs,restaurants,art galleries, showrooms, banks dot this lively stretch. It is hard to believe that it was once a general parade ground with its barracks and regiments and from where the military and civil station burgeoned.

But look closely. And you will still see remainders of the by-gone era in the hidden houses tucked behind buildings,in the plaques of churches,in the signboards and statues….. Here are few fleeting glimpses of the station it once was.

At the east end of M.G.Road stands the Holy Trinity Church. It was one of the second churches in the area-the first was St Mark’s Cathedral. This century old church built in 1852 for the British Regiment has a number of tablets dedicated to officers who died in various battles of South East Asia.

There are tablets mentioning about officers of Mysore Revenue survey-there is one that talks about a officer who died from tiger wounds at shimoga; the 4th Hussars[Queen’s Own], King’s Dragoon Guards, Royal Artillery etc. Men who died at sea on their way to England,or of cholera on their march towards Bangalore finds mention here. Most of these are dated before 1880’s and gives a glimpse of society back then. During the summer of 1914, the Station had several troops-the 7th Hussars,the 26th Light Cavalry, the 13th Brigade R.F.A, 2nd and 44th Batteries,R.F.A,the 108th infantry etc.

As you make your way out of the Church you catch sight of  Mayo Hall- another colonial building dedicated to Lord Mayo,Viceroy of India. It was used as municipal offices,the upper floor was meant for public meetings.

Before this stately building is the statue of Rev Ferdinand Kittel, a priest from Germany who had joined the Basel Mission and had come to Karnataka to spread Christianity. However he is remembered for his first Kannada to English dictionary compiled in 1894. He mingled with the locals, understanding their culture,language and his dictionary reflects this trait. The 1758 paged book covered more than 70000 words and often included commonplace or local words apart from the usual meanings and synonyms of words. He is seen here holding a kannada flag.

As you wind your way up and come towards MG Road-St Mark’s Road you hit the 1912 stone building of Bible Society and the Tract and Book Society . The Bible Society is responsible for printing and distributing Bible in different languages. Today it also prints literature books.

Another section of the building facing the St Mark’s Road has the Hard Rock Cafe, that was a Tea room during the cantonment days, then went over to Tract and Book Society section and then to a music store, a pub and finally the Hard Rock Cafe.

As you trudge ahead you sight the St Mark’s Cathedral and then the Queen Victoria Statue at Cubbon Park. The park served as the buffer zone for the old city and the cantonment. After nearly an hour’s walk you realize that there are a lot of hidden jewels in the city that the unplanned urban development has not been able to erase. And you wish to learn more. That’s when you must book a heritage walk with Unhurried and tag along for a slow heritage walk with us.

–Usha

 

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